© 2019 Pipe Bands Australia

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The inaugural
recipients

Performance

Education and

training

Promotion and

administration

  • Nat Russell GC OAM - Nat began his dynamic piping career aged 10 with the 8th Belfast Company of the Boys Brigade, was Piper of the Year in 1969 and competed with Field Marshal Montgomery until enlistment with 1st Battalion Irish Guards in 1970. In the Guards Piping School his piping experience and ability increased under the various Irish and Scots Guards Tutors of the period. In 1974 Nat joined the Royal Ulster Constabulary and under his leadership and direction the band won 7 Ulster Championships, as well as every “major” Pipe Band Championship in the World through Grades 3 and 2, being crowned World Champions Grade 2 in 1981 and became one of the world’s top three Grade 1 bands. In 1987 Nat was recruited as Pipe Major of the Victoria Police Pipe Band. Under his direction, the competition success of the band remains unprecedented in the Southern Hemisphere, winning five Australian championships (four in Grade 1) and culminating in winning the Grade 1 World Pipe Band Championship in 1998. Nat served as vice-principal of piping in Victoria for 15 years, teaching and examining candidates for Certification and Adjudication training in piping and ensemble. Nat has produced five highly-acclaimed recordings: two live concerts and three in studio. His services to Piping, Pipe Bands and Adjudication were recognised with the award of the Order of Australia medal in 2007. Nat is an esteemed member of the RSPBA Adjudication Panel and his service to that Panel was recognised in August 2011 with the presentation of the Adjudicators “long service award.” He has adjudicated Pipe Band competitions and solo events at the highest level all around the World, including the World Championships on several occasions.

 

  • Bob Semple OAM BEM - In  the eyes of the public and the pipe band world, no one more clearly typifies the pipe band experience as than Drum Major RJK (Bob) Semple, involved in pipe bands since 1936 when he joined the Victorian Scottish Regiment. At the outbreak of World War Two he put aside his pipes and joined the Australian Field Regiment and between 1940 and 1945 Bob saw service in some of the most active theatres of war - Palestine, Lebanon, Egypt, the siege of Tobruk, El Alamein and later in New Guinea and Borneo. The same month Bob returned to Australia in l946, he joined the Hawthorn City Pipe Band after listening to the band playing in a local park. So began one of the great success stories of the Australian pipe band scene. Between 1946 and 1960 Bob served as a piper with the band where the foundations were laid for the great success of the future decades. At the conclusion of his piping career Bob assumed the position of drum major which he still holds today, aged almost 98. As drum major, Bob Semple has made an indelible stamp on the character of the pipe band fraternity – he was the Victorian champion on 24 out of a possible 28 occasions up to 1987. At the national level has won the Australian title no fewer than seven times. In 1977 he was elected the first Principal Dress and Drill and held the position until his retirement a decade later. Bob is also the chieftain of Pipe Bands Australia.

 

  • Ian Morison OAM – Ian’s contribution to the pipe band community has been outstanding. He has helped to broaden the reach of piping throughout Australia. He served tirelessly on the Geelong Highland Gathering Committee and assisted local organisations, pipe bands and individuals.  His service to the pipe band community across the nation has been exemplary.  Not only has he filled many major positions in the administrative area, he has helped rural communities, assisted small and developing bands, been a senior competition judge, trained band members in dress and drill, instructed other drum majors, and been at the masthead of pipe band performance in competitive and public events across the country.  At both of the Sydney Edinburgh Tattoos, held in 2005 and 2010, Ian Morison was the senior Australian drum major. From 1995 until 2005 Ian was Principal Dress and Drill. Throughout all of Ian’s commitments, whether administrative, instructional or performance, he continued to serve in his own band, the City of Melbourne Highland Pipe Band, for more than 30 years as drum major.

 

  • Sandy Campbell - Sandy emigrated to Brisbane in 1950 after serving in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. After a short stay in Brisbane he married his long-time partner Mary Leask and returned to Scotland for a further three years.  In 1954 Sandy and Mary returned to Australia and moved to Mt Isa in north Queensland to work in the mines until 1957 when they returned to Brisbane. He met up with Pipe Major Donald McKinnon (ex-KOSB) and formed the Mt Isa Pipe Band which quickly achieved prominence in the competition arena. Sandy is no doubt a leader and was a most influential person in the pipe band scene throughout the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s in Australia. His success can only be attributed to his dedicated teaching of many hundreds of pupils and the importance of maintaining standards, always seeking to raise the bar. Through his teachings, not only did he excel in pushing the limits in pipe band standards, he is recognised for his contribution in paving the way for many successful solo players in realising their personal achievement in both Australia and Scotland. Sandy set the scene with the introduction of Australian bands travelling to Scotland and Northern Ireland to compete back in 1978 - 1985 saw the pinnacle of his achievements, encompassing a seven-week tour which resulted in Queensland Irish winning the Grade 2 Championship at the Cowal Highland Gathering. Sandy played a significate role in opening up the regular flow of players, instructors and adjudicators bringing their international expertise to Australia. As pipe major he won nine Australian Grade 1 championships – five with Red Hackle and four with Queensland Irish. Sandy was always seeking to raise the bar.  Sandy’s success in Scotland with the Queensland Irish Association not only put Australian bands on the world stage, but perhaps more importantly it gave Australians the confidence that they could match it with the world’s best.

 

  • Duncan MacLennan MBE – Duncan MacLennan was particularly influential in the advancement of pipe band performance in Australia in the years following World War Two, using his training in Scotland and knowledge of the bagpipes to benefit soldiers returning home and the arrival of a new wave of Scottish emigrants, having served as a pipe major during the war. He initially was in Ballarat where he soon had that band as one of the leading bands in the country and later returned to Victoria Scottish Regiment that became a leader in pipe band performance in the 1950s and 1960s. He also continued to tutor numerous other bands in those post-war years. Duncan was also a founding member of the Pipers’ Club of Victoria where solo playing was promoted.

 

  • Alex McCormick – After a career as a one of Scotland’s leading drummers and principal of the RSPBA college, Alex emigrated to Australia in 1952 with several other prominent players of the time to reform Castlemaine Pipe Band in rural Victoria, which was importing the leaders of a new band before turning to Melbourne and later Ballarat. Alex and his compatriot brought with them from Scotland the style of drumming that caused a revolution in the Australian pipe band world. From 1949 to 1952, he was Principal of  Drumming at the Scottish Pipe Band Association College. In this position he was involved as a teacher and also in the development of the syllabus. Alexander McCormick is rightly recognized as one of the pipe band world’s most influential leaders, and one of the founding fathers of modern pipe band drumming. His performance career in Australia was short but the impact was immediate and influential, forging a new era in pipe band drumming in this country.

 

  • Allan Chatto OAM – Initially joining St George District Pipe Band, Allan found greater interest as a drummer and over more than 50 years has taken his skills to high levels and shared them as lead drummer with leading bands of the eras including Sydney Thistle and NSW Police and also included stints with top Scottish bands. His record in competition with Sydney Thistle, at the time one of Australia’s premier pipe bands, set up a journey that took Allan to performance opportunities across Australia, New Zealand and Scotland.

 

  • Harold Gillespie - Began his drumming career in 1961 aged 9 with Mitcham Pipe Band before joining Nunawading, Hawthorn and Victoria Police in Australia and Ballynahinch in Northern Ireland. Harold’s extensive record of sustained success and achievement in pipe band circles is one of outstanding and unparalleled excellence. A combination of expert drumming technique and styles have contributed to Harold’s wealth of knowledge which he has passed on throughout his years of leadership, band and personal tuition, workshops and adjudication. Harold’s many years of playing, leadership, teaching and mentorship see him as most highly respected and admired drummer, both nationally and internationally. Harold’s performance career in Australia saw him as drum sergeant or flank drummer with some of the nation’s leading bands from the 1970sthrough to the 1990s, including the 1998 World champions Victoria Police.

 

  • Brett Tidswell - He has a long and respected history as an educator of pipers at the highest of levels and has been principal piping in Australia since 2003 overseeing development of education and training for pipers and adjudicators. Having been employed as a piping instructor in the Defence Force and for some years as a full-time bagpipe teacher; in 1991 he was asked to take on the role of pipe major of the newly formed, City of Adelaide Pipe Band. That band seven years later was crowned Australian champions. During his playing career, Brett has also achieved on the international stage playing with Strathclyde Police. Brett has been described as the only piper to win Australia’s top solo piping competition (a record 12 wins of the RU Brown Piobaireachd Society Gold Medal) as well as pipe majoring a Grade 1 Australian championship winning band, “an impressive feat that will not be beaten in this generation”.

 

  • Buzz Ennis – Colin “Buzz” Ennis was at the forefront of developing Australian bands in the 1970s and 1980s to reaching world standards in drumming. His playing inspired future generations in a career that was mostly with Queensland Irish where he is still associated and also Red Hackle and St Andrew’s. He has been a prolific teacher and composer of drum scores and for decades has been the face of drumming education in Queensland. He is a former vice-principal drumming in the state.

  • Sam Young - Sam began his piping in 1960 under his father, Ian Young in Queensland who in his own right had a strong background in tradition piping values and authentic teachings. In 1974 Sam was accepted as a pupil under the Queen’s Piper, Pipe Major RB Nicol of  Balmoral where he received extensive tuition in piobaireachd and light music. For over 40 years Sam has successfully competed with great success in solo events and bands. Throughout the 1980s Sam was piper in the Grade 1 Queensland Irish Sandy Campbell.  Queensland Irish was a forerunner to pipe bands travelling from Australia to Scotland and Ireland to win major competitions. In more recent years Sam was instrumental in the reformation of the NSW Police Pipe Band and its competition achievements throughout the 1990s. He served as pipe major for a total of 17 years in that organisation. Sam was heavily involved with the management of the band structure under the NSW Police Volunteers in Policing program maintaining both musical and business processes. Throughout the years Sam has been involved in both the Queensland and NSW Pipers’ Societies with participation in solo competitions, recitals and competition promotions. Sam has held the position of vice-principal piping and in 2005 he was appointed to the Royal Scottish Pipe Band Association's International Adjudicators Panel as a Piping Adjudicator. In recent times his adjudication appointments have included Grade 1 at the World Pipe Band Championships.

 

  • Rob MacGregor – Rob’s achievement in pipe band performance of pipe bands has helped chart the way in several the Pacific Rim within Army and community bands. Rob began his career in NSW before moving Mount Isa and later Brisbane as pipe major of Brisbane Caledonian and founder of Brisbane Blue Bonnets, later becoming piper major of St Andrew’s. Rob later served as music director for four years of the PNG Correctional Services Pipe Band. He also led Australia pipers and drummers to competition in Jakarta.

  • Alex McCormick – After a career as a one of Scotland’s leading drummers and principal of the RSPBA college, Alex emigrated to Australia in 1952 with several other prominent players of the time to reform Castlemaine Pipe Band in regional Victoria, which was importing the leaders of a new band, before turning to Melbourne and later Ballarat. Alex and his compatriots brought with them from Scotland the style of drumming that caused a revolution in the Australian pipe band world. From 1949 to 1952, he was Principal of Drumming at the Scottish Pipe Band Association College. In this position he was involved as a teacher and also in the development of the syllabus. After he emigrated, he kept this up by carrying out SPBA College examinations in Australia for a time. He taught all over Australia and was a leading proponent of the idea of an Australian college examination system. This did not happen until 1967, when Alex became the founding Principal Drumming of the Australian Pipe Band College, a position he held until 1979. Alex was an excellent drumming adjudicator and was a driving force involved with an early attempt to bring ensemble adjudication to Australia in the early 1990s, conducting trials at competitions in Victoria. Alexander McCormick is rightly recognised as one of the pipe band world’s most influential leaders, and one of the founding fathers of modern pipe band drumming. His impact on all those he taught and anyone with whom he came into contact in the pipe band scene and beyond is indelible.

 

  • Allan Chatto OAM – Initially joining St George District Pipe Band as a piper, Allan found greater interest in drumming and over more than 50 years has taken his skills to high levels and shared them around the world as a teacher, tutor, adjudicator and educator. Allan is believed to have been the first Australian admitted a drumming adjudicator with RSPBA and was Principal Drumming in Australia for eights years, having achieved qualifications both here and in Scotland. Allan has written a number of books on pipe band drumming that received international recognition and was active in reviewing, refining and updating the Australian training syllabus, the preparation of instruction manuals, writing new massed band drum scores. He was active for many years in presenting workshops and lectures in Australia and New Zealand. During his playing career, Allan performed with top Australian bands and guested with bands in New Zealand and Scotland. He studied the development of pipe band drumming and its personalities with many of his definitive, technical and historical articles being published Australia, New Zealand, Scotland, Canada, USA, Spain and Switzerland

 

  • Harold Gillespie - Began his drumming career in 1961 aged 9 with Mitcham Pipe Band before joining Nunawading, Hawthorn and Victoria Police in Australia and Ballynahinch in Northern Ireland. Harold’s extensive record of sustained success and achievement in pipe band circles is one of outstanding and unparalleled excellence. A combination of expert drumming technique and styles have contributed to Harold’s wealth of knowledge which he has passed on throughout his years of leadership, band and personal tuition, workshops and adjudication. Harold’s many years of playing, leadership, teaching and mentorship see him as most highly respected and admired drummer, both nationally and internationally. A former vice-principal drumming where he conducted training and examinations and RSPBA international panel adjudicator, Harold has assisted many bands through workshops and mentoring. Every drum score imparted was his original composition to all bands instructed.  Several bands including Grade 1 UK bands have used or copied these drum scores. His influence on several generations of students at Haileybury is evident with successes in band championships over 20 years plus solo championship achievements.

 

  • Brett Tidswell - He has a long and respected history as an educator of pipers at the highest of levels and has been Principal Piping in Australia since 2003 overseeing development of education and training for pipers and adjudicators. He was employed as a piping instructor in the Defence Force and for some years has been a full-time bagpipe teacher; in 1991 he was asked to take on the role of pipe major of the newly formed, City of Adelaide Pipe Band. That band seven years later was crowned Australian champions. Brett is a soloist of international renown with many competition successes and a demand to perform at recitals around the world. His students also have a history of such success, with many solo prizes and band championships to their credit. He is author of the acclaimed The Complete Pipers Handbook and his technical articles have been published in some of the world including New Zealand, USA, Canada and Scotland.

 

  • Donald Blair – The influence of Warrnambool’s Donald Blair as a pipe tutor and educator has spread around Australia and internationally over the decades. He was a pioneering tutor of Victorian Certificate of Education (Year 12) piping students and continues to tutor students from far away using skype and other technology. Donald was a co-founder of the South West Coast Piper Drummer Dancer Workshop held annually in Warrnambool for the past 17 years and has tutored at national schools and for bands in Victoria and South Australia. The Warrnambool “nursery” has attracted generations of aspiring pipers and sent those pipers out to the world as soloists and band players.

   

 

  • Nat Russell GC OAM – Since arriving in Australia in 1987, Nat has been a leader in education and training in Australia and extending engagement in the development of pipe bands in the Southern Hemisphere, particularly in the areas of piping and ensemble. Nat set up the Victoria Police Piping and Drumming School in Melbourne in 1988 in conjunction with the Council of Adult Education. This programme had some 99 participants, including the conductor of the Victorian State Opera who wanted to learn more about woodwind instruments and the effect on ensemble. Nat served as vice-principal of piping in Victoria for 15 years, teaching and examining candidates for Certification and Adjudication training in piping and ensemble. He has also conducted numerous workshops and seminar while also tutoring and assisting bands.

 

  • Lewis MacLennan jnr BEM – Another of the famous MacLennans, the activities of Lewis jnr brought benefits to piping in several states. After World War Two, when he served in the army, Lewis was pipe major of the new Perth Highland formed by ex-servicemen and also established a band at Scotch College Perth. He re-enlisted in the Australian Army and accepted a posting to New Guinea, where he established the Pacific Island Regiment Pipe Band, returning to Perth six years later to resume with Perth Highland and Scotch College with both achieving success over the following 15 years. He retired to Terang, Victoria, in 1978 where he tutored the local band before spending his final years in Melbourne.

 

  • Ron Gallacher OAM – Pipe major of Hawthorn City Pipe Band on several occasions, Ron was 20 years Principal Piping in Australia and an influential driver in developing the adjudicator training syllabus and adjudicator handbook. He was active in fostering education and training for many bands across Victoria and Australia and also an early advocate and participant in sharing knowledge of Australia pipers and bands into South-East Asia. As pipe major of Hawthorn, Ron imparted his knowledge on many pipers that was then taken to other bands across Australia and continues to influence the music of today.

 

  • Donald Patterson – An icon of pipe tutors in a small country area who inspired generations of young people to begin and continue their journey after leaving “the bush” was Don Patterson. He joined the Naracoorte Highland Pipe Band in as a learner piper at aged 11and became pipe major in 1971, bringing many pipers through to the playing ranks. He ensured connection between city and country - serving as South Australian branch chairman and organising competitions for player skill development.

 

  • Danny McPherson - After serving in the Boer War with the Seaforths, he worked at the bagpipe makers Peter Henderson and Sons of Glasgow repairing pipes before emigrating to Australia before World War One. After service again, he returned to Australia and began travelling with bagpipes – in 1919 he was with Ballarat Caledonian Society Pipe Band as ‘Assistant Pipe Major’, though more likely as a tutor, and then in 1922 as founding pipe major of the Mildura and District Pipe Band. In 1926 he moved to Millicent, South Australia, and formed that town’s pipe band, later moving to Melbourne with the Royal Caledonian Society Pipe Band and following World War Two accepted the role of tutor to establish the first Scotch College band. Retirement in 1957 was short-lived with Danny accepting the role of establishing the pipes program at Haileybury College until his death two years later.

 

  • Doug Thoreson – Beginning his piping career in his native New Zealand, Doug has contributed to education and training of pipers in the Australian Army where he was director of pipe music and in community bands, passing on skills attained completing the pipe major course at Edinburgh Castle and through decades of involvement in the movement. Following his army career, Doug joined Queensland Police Pipe Band and also travelled the breadth of the state teaching pipers in the art of solo and band playing and acting as a resource for knowledge on the instrument and its music.

 

  • William Bruce - Over the years, Australian and World Championships results have been attained by pipers as a direct result of the excellent tuition and leadership provided by Bill. He spent his time unselfishly teaching children and bands to play and he developed each of his students into fine piper and developed a number of future pipe majors of leading bands in Australia. Bill was closely associated with Moorabbin band which today wears the tartan named in his honour.

  • Anthony Sell – Began his involvement in pipe bands as foundation secretary of Melbourne University Pipe Band while studying law at Melbourne and was later president of Nunawading Pipe Band. He was first elected to executive position in Victoria in the 1960s as assistant secretary and later secretary. Tony was vice-principal Rules and Administration in Victoria and the first principal, serving from 1991 to 2009. In those roles, he was largely responsible for the drafting of rules and regulations during more than 40 years of distinguished service.

 

  • Lew Zilles OAM ED – Was at the forefront of establishing the Victorian Highland Pipe Band Association in 1924, the first in the world, by calling a meeting of bands at Maryborough on New Year’s Day that year. Lew for 50 years was drum major Ballarat Highland Pipe Band (now Federation University) and made a significant contribution to the writing of drill instruction manuals while also acting as an adjudicator until the 1980s. He was active in establishing performance opportunities for bands and massed band presentations. Was also involved with marching girls and brass bands.

  • Legato Australia Pty Ltd – One of the greatest advancements in pipe band drumming emerged from a factory in the Melbourne suburb of Reservoir in the 1980s with development of the Legato K series snare drum using the “Banjo” or “Floating Shell” system of snare drum construction. Leading Drummer John Kingston joined to assist with this exciting project designing drums able to withstand the extreme tension which came about with the introduction of the Kevlar heads.  These revolutionary drums were patented and exported worldwide and took many bands to prizes, including the Grade 1 Worlds Pipe Band Championship drum corps prize. This system changed the design of the pipe band snare drum around the world.  Once again Australia was leading the way with ingenuity in design of our instruments.

 

  • Bruce Neal OAM -  He was Victorian vice president from 1970 to 1976, and subsequently president, a position he held until 1994, a period of some 18 years. As President of the AFPBA for an extended period from 1987 to 1995, Bruce worked to bring the former federation of state-based associations together as a single entity. Bruce’s interest in drumming and pipe bands has been life-long. He learnt drums under the tuition of Alex McCormick and was for many years a drummer with City of Melbourne Highland Pipe Band, and drum sergeant for much of that time. Bruce was also for many years the full-time drumming tutor at Haileybury in Melbourne, and during this time, the band won several Australian and Victorian Pipe Band Championship

 

 

  • David Scotland BEM – Following in the footsteps of his father, David commenced as a piper with Lakemba Caledonian Society aged 14 and joined the Campsie Scottish Association committee at age 16, commencing decades of service as an administrator and promoter that included terms as Australian association president and secretary as well as a leading administrator in NSW where he organised special performance events for Royal tours and other occasions. For more than 30 years he was chief band marshal for Sydney’s ANZAC Day march. David assisted in organising the 1960 meeting to establish the Australian Federation of Pipe Band Associations and was elected deputy chairman of the Australian Scottish Heritage Council on its formation in 1981.

 

  • Ewen Masson OAM – Ewen had a lifelong interest in Scottish culture and in 1956 became president of the Port Adelaide Caledonian Society Pipe Band and through this, the SA Band Association which was predominantly a brass band association. In 1958 Ewen became a co- founder of the South Australian Pipe Band Association which at that stage, was Adelaide based that later merged with South East - SA group and from 1962 until his retirement in 1976, he held the position of president. Ewen led the SA Pipe Band Association to joining the Australian Federation in 1960 and served several terms as president. He was a co- founder of the Adelaide Highland Games holding competitions from 1960 through to the late 1980s, including Australian championships in 1964, 1966, 1968 and 1976. Ewen was also a foundation member and driving force for the formation of the RU Brown Piobaireachd Society of SA and served as its first president.

  • Duncan MacLennan MBE – Glaswegian-born Duncan served as a piper in the British Army during World War One and later in Egypt before joining other family members in Australia in 1927 where he was pipe major of the Hamilton (Victoria) band and later playing in Melbourne where he joined the regular army and on outbreak of World War Two the 2/5th Battalion band recruited mostly from Victoria Scottish Regiment. Following the war, he was pipe major of Ballarat Highland before returning to Melbourne and pipe major of VSR and later piping instructor at Haileybury College. From late 1945 till 1946 he served the Victorian Highland Pipe Band Association as Secretary, returning to this during an interregnum in 1955.  He served as Vice-President from1953 to 1961, and then as President from 1961 to 1974, following the inauguralpPresident William Plain. He supported the formation of the Australian Federation of Pipe Band Associations in 1960, serving as its President in 1961, and as Principal Piping from 1967 to 1971.

 

  • Margaret Johnstone OAM – A piper with Melbourne Ladies, Margaret at age 18 became its youngest-ever pipe major and saw the band progress to Grade 1, touring France as pipe major of Edinburgh Girl Pipers during an extended trip overseas in the 1960s. As an administrator, Margaret first became involved as a branch councillor in 1972 and for 23 years was Victorian secretary and served as Australian secretary for eight years. Also continues to act as a contest supervisor.

 

  • Michael Stubbings - Michael commenced his pipe band career in 1964 at the St Mary’s District Band Club Pipes and Drums and later Lakemba Caledonian Pipe Band where he was introduced to the snare drum. Michael later played snare, tenor or bass drum with Sydney Thistle, City of Blacktown No1 and St Mary’s in Grade 1, Rooty Hill RSL in Grade 2, Epping Pipe Band, Sydney University Pipes & Drums and City of Blacktown No2 in Grade 3 and Blue Mountains in Grade 4. Along the way he also found himself out the front of bands as drum major. As an administrator Michael had over 40 years’ experience as a band secretary, was  involved with Pipe Bands NSW including terms as president. Michael was a dress and drill adjudicator, contest supervisor and a drumming adjudicator. He was served as vice-principal of Rules and Administration in NSW and as national principal. Michael was also active in tutoring many bands.

 

  • Robert McPherson OAM - Has been involved in the pipe band movement as a promoter and contest organiser for more than 42 years. Robert has been the key organiser and focal point for bands for the Maclean Highland Gathering, one of Australia's longest running pipe band and solo competitions whose origins date back to 1893.He joined the Lower Clarence Scottish Association in the early 1970s and served as secretary from 1972-1975 inclusive, 1980 and for an uninterrupted period of 32 years from 1984 to 2015. He was a founding member of the Maclean: Scottish Town in Australia Committee and has served the committee in a number of roles and has held the role of president for many years. The Maclean: Scottish Town in Australia is responsible for recognising the town's Scottish cultural links and using them to promote the town as a business and tourist destination.

 

  • Brian Edmonds – Beginning as a piper and later drum major, Brian became a successful advocate for pipe bands in Australia as Queensland branch chairman and national secretary both within Australia and internationally where he attended the Alliance of North American Pipe Band Associations meetings at an Australian delegate. Brian was also a dress and drill adjudicator and contest supervisor.

 

  • Rob MacGregor – Recognised for his advancement of pipe bands within the Army and community and in Papua New Guinea. Rob began his career in NSW before moving Mount Isa and later Brisbane as pipe major of Brisbane Caledonian and founder of Brisbane Blue Bonnets, later becoming piper major of St Andrew’s. Rob later served as music director for four years of the PNG Correctional Services Pipe Band. He also led Australia pipers and drummers to competition in Jakarta and developed skills to manufacture and repair bagpipes.

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